SCHEDULE

We have scheduled our Programs dividing them into Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 in order to make it convenient for you to attend in absolute comfort. 

25 Jan
Day 1

Keynote Forum : 1

Madhu Sharma RD

Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research ,India

Title: Nutrition and mental health

Time : 10:00 - 10:40

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Biography:

Madhu Sharma is a registered dietician since 1982. She did her graduation in Home Science from SIET Women’s College, Madras (Madras University) after which she obtained her Masters in Foods and Nutrition from Home Science College, Hyderabad, APAU. She has been closely associated in the field of Gastroenterology and Paediatric Nutrition for more than 3 decades during her service in PGIMER, Chandigarh (1980-2012). She is trained in management of Cystic fibrosis in children from Dundee, Scotland. She is the Hon Vice President of IAPEN, Hon Joint Secretary ISPEN, Past Convenor of Indian Dietetic Association, Chandigarh and Life member of NSI and WCN. She has also authored 3 books on Paediatric Nutrition.  Currently she is attached as Consultant with various city hospitals and nursing homes and has her own website and clinic by name Diet for Life. As Chapter President of IDA at Chandigarh she has been actively involved in conducting CNEs and workshops from time to time since the last four years on various aspects of Clinical Nutrition. She has to her credit many talks on infant feeding and nutrition and women’s’ health organised by different groups from time to time. She is passionately involved in all activities in Nutrition and Dietetics and aims to continue serving in this profession, thereby serving the community at large.

Abstract:

It is now well established that a healthy body is an essential requirement for not only prevention of physical and physiological ailments, but also for a healthy mind or ‘mental health’ as it is so termed. Healthy lifestyle practices encompass a balance of eating behaviour and a positive mental attitude. Most of the non communicable diseases which are on the rise in the past few decades, may be closely linked to the mental health an individual, which in turn is influenced by his/her eating behaviour. Depression is one of the mental health problems which are known to be closely associated with one’s dietary pattern. However, it may be kept in mind that there is no single diet or food which may be associated with prevention or causative factor in depression. A balanced wholesome diet and lifestyle factors which impact the circadian rhythm or biological clock of the body, combined with physical activity all contribute in management and prevention of depression. Foods rich in anti oxidants which facilitate eradication of free radicals in the body are extremely beneficial which also have anti inflammatory effect on the body. Proteins from low fat dairy, nuts and legumes, complex carbohydrates, foods rich in B complex group especially folates, vitamin D and certain other micronutrients are all important nutrient components in the diet which can help prevent depression. The key in prevention of depression and maintaining a good mental health lies in a blend of healthy eating behaviour, adequate physical activity, healthy sleep pattern and avoidance of junk and processed foods.

Keynote Forum-2

Majid Hajifaraji

National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute ,Iran

Title: The effect of stevia on lipid profile and glycemic index of type two diabetic patients: A randomized controlled trial

Time : 10:40 - 11:20

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Biography:

Majid Hajifaraji, is a Research Associate Prof. He received his PhD in nutrition from KCL, UK. He has been Director of National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Dean of Faculty from 2010- 2015, Head of WHO- Collaborating Centre for Nutrition Training and Research from 2010- 2015 and President of Iranian Nutrition Society (INS) from 2011- 2015. He is a member of the National Board of Nutrition and academy of Medical Sciences, Iran. He has over 60 publications that have been cited over 740 times and has been serving as Chair and Editor-in- chief, Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences Research and member of the editorial board 


Abstract:

Recent studies suggest that artificial sweeteners contribute to weight gain and hence risk of metabolic syndromes, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. Nowadays, use of Natural Calorie-Free Sweeteners like: natural-based stevia as a suitable alternative for sugar & even artificial sweetener has become important. In this study, effects of sweetened tea with stevia or sucralose on glycemic response and lipid profile of type 2 diabetic patients were investigated.  A double-blind randomized clinical trial was carried out to investigate and compare the effects of stevia and sucralose sweetened teas in 39 eligible type-2 diabetic patients, who were randomly assigned into two groups (19 in stevia and 20 in control groups). Five patients were excluded from the study due to withdraw. Fasting blood glucose and 2hrs post prandial glucose as well as fasting HbA1c, glycemic response and lipid profile of the participants were assessed. Furthermore, height, weight and body mass index (BMI) of the participants were determined as well as their dietary intakes at the baseline and weeks 4 and 8 of the study. Findings showed no significant differences between fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels at the base line and after two hours in participants. No significant differences in insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and lipid levels were found between the two groups. Results of the current study showed that the highlighted doses of stevia in sweetened tea could be an alternative to sucralose in diabetic patients with no effects on blood glucose, HbA1C, insulin and lipid levels.Keywords: stevia, sucralose, type 2 diabetes, glycemic response, lipid profile

Keynote Forum : 3
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Biography:

Dipak Ramji is Professor of Cardiovascular Science at the School of Biosciences. He received his BSc (Hons) degree (Biochemistry) and his PhD (Molecular Biology) from University of Leeds. This was followed by post-doctoral research at European Molecular Biology Laboratory (Heidelberg) and Istituto di Ricerche di Biologia Molecolare P. Angeletti (Rome) with fellowships from the Royal Society and the EU. He joined Cardiff University in 1992 as a lecturer, progressing to a Personal Chair in 2017. His research is focused on understanding how the immune and inflammatory responses regulate cellular processes in cardiovascular disease with the goal of attaining deeper mechanistic insight and identifying preventative/therapeutic agents. His research has been funded by several organisations and received continuous funding from the British Heart Foundation since 1997 (h index 35, i10 index 70, over 5950 citations). He has previously acted as Expert Evaluator and Panel Member for Horizon 2020, Panel member of IRCSET (Ireland) Postdoctoral Fellowship Scheme Assessment Committee, BBSRC Pool of Experts and member of the MRC Advisory Board. He is currently Scientific Advisory Board of the International Academy of Cardiology, Editorial Board member of 15 international journals, regular organising committee member, speaker and track/session chair at international conferences on heart disease, and involved in grant evaluation for over 20 organisations. He has supervised 22 PhD students to completion, all of whom have gone on to excellent subsequent careers with three gaining Personal Chairs. In addition to research, he is involved in teaching and administration, including Postgraduate Tutor for the Biomedicine division at the School of Biosciences and external examiner for Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences at University of Reading and King’s College London.

Abstract:

Cardiovascular disease is responsible for about a third of all global deaths. Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disorder of medium and large arteries, is the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease. Although reduction in morbidity and mortality from atherosclerosis and its complications has been achieved recently by lifestyle changes and pharmaceutical intervention, this is expected to reverse in the future because of global increase in risk factors such as obesity and diabetes. Current pharmaceutical therapies against atherosclerosis are associated with substantial residual risk for cardiovascular disease together with other issues such as side effects. In addition, pharmaceutical agents against many promising targets have proved disappointing at the clinical level. It is therefore essential that the molecular basis of atherosclerosis is fully understood and new therapeutic/preventative agents or targets are identified and validated. The major focus of research in my laboratory is to understand the molecular basis of atherosclerosis using in vitro and in vivo model systems together with the actions of preventative/therapeutic agents. Our research has particularly provided novel insights into the actions of natural products with health benefits beyond their nutritional value (nutraceuticals). This presentation will discuss new perspectives in the field of atherosclerosis research and opportunities for drug discovery, current therapies against the disease and their limitations, emerging therapies targeting lipid metabolism and the inflammatory response, and the potential of nutraceuticals as preventative/therapeutic agents.
Keywords: Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Disease; Natural Products; Nutraceuticals; Mechanisms

Keynote Forum : 4
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Raffaele Pilla, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Doctor Europaeus, received his Master’s degree in Pharmacy at G. d’Annunzio University in Chieti-Pescara, Italy in 2005, where he also served internships at the Cell Physiology Laboratory and Molecular Biology Laboratory. Prior, he was an Erasmus Student at Faculté de Pharmacie de Reims in Reims, France. He received his Doctor Europaeus in 2010 from Pitié-Salpétrière Institute in Paris, France. Also in 2010, he received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry, Physiology, and Pathology of Muscle at G. d’Annunzio University in Chieti-Pescara, Italy. He was hired as a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida in Tampa, on two research grants funded by the Office of Naval Research (US Navy) and Divers’ Alert Network. He has written and lectured widely worldwide. He has been involved in ongoing research at the University of South Florida with the use of ketone esters.

Abstract:

It has been recently shown that nutritional ketosis is effective against seizure disorders and various acute/chronic neurological disorders. Physiologically, glucose is the primary metabolic fuel for cells. However, many neurodegenerative disorders have been associated with impaired glucose transport/metabolism and with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as Alzheimer’s/Parkinson’s disease, general seizure disorders, and traumatic brain injury. Ketone bodies and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates represent alternative fuels for the brain and can bypass the rate-limiting steps associated with impaired neuronal glucose metabolism. Therefore, therapeutic ketosis can be considered as a metabolic therapy by providing alternative energy substrates. It has been estimated that the brain derives over 60% of its total energy from ketones when glucose availability is limited. In fact, after prolonged periods of fasting or ketogenic diet (KD), the body utilizes energy obtained from free fatty acids (FFAs) released from adipose tissue. Because the brain is unable to derive significant energy from FFAs, hepatic ketogenesis converts FFAs into ketone bodies-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc)-while a percentage of AcAc spontaneously decarboxylates to acetone. Large quantities of ketone bodies accumulate in the blood through this mechanism. This represents a state of normal physiological ketosis and can be therapeutic. Ketone bodies are transported across the blood-brain barrier by monocarboxylic acid transporters to fuel brain function. Starvation or nutritional ketosis is an essential survival mechanism that ensures metabolic flexibility during prolonged fasting or lack of carbohydrate ingestion. Therapeutic ketosis leads to metabolic adaptations that may improve brain metabolism, restore mitochondrial ATP production, decrease reactive oxygen species production, reduce inflammation, and increase neurotrophic factors’ function. It has been shown that KD mimics the effects of fasting and the lack of glucose/insulin signaling, promoting a metabolic shift towards fatty acid utilization. In this work, the author reports a number of successful case reports treated through metabolic ketosis.

Speaker - 1

Angelo Pietrobelli

University of Verona ,Italy

Title: Early-life nutrition and future health: Will they be giants?

Time : 12:55 - 13:25

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Biography:

He is a Doctor in Medicine with the specialty on Pediatric Endocrinology who worked with Dr. Heymsfield for four years at the New York Obesity Research Center, Columbia University, St. Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York (USA). Currently, he is working, as Associate Professor, in the Premature Intensive Unit Care in Verona Pediatric Clinic, Verona University Medical School, Verona (ITALY).He is Associate Professor in Nutrition and also  Adjunct Associate Professor at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, (USA).  

Abstract:

Pediatric Unit, Department od Surgical Sciences, Dentistry, Gynecology and Pediatrics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy,  *Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.In the last decades early childhood deaths have declined, but in contrast, years lived with disability  have increased. Recent evidence demonstrates that the environment in early life can have important effects on fetal and postnatal growth, on development and on risk of developing common non-communicable diseases later in life. Recent studies underlined that method of infant feeding affects body composition development and quality of growth differences between breastfed and formula fed infants have been attributed to differences in both quality and quantity of nutrient intake.  There is an additional dimension to measuring growth since it is now recognized that growth patterns and nutritional experience across infancy and childhood are associated with later risk for metabolic syndrome. As a result, tools have been developed to identify and monitor infants and children growth. Epidemiological data indicate that early life nutrition play a powerful role in influencing later susceptibility to certain chronic diseases. An increased understanding of developmental plasticity (defined as the ability of an organism to develop in various ways, depending on the particular environment or setting) provides a conceptual basis for these observations.  The key goals of the talk were to discuss approaches to assess growth pregnancy to adolescence, as well as nutrition both for day-by-day clinical work and for research setting, keeping in mind that the 9 months of gestation constitute the most consequential period of our lives, permanently influencing the wiring of the brain and the functioning of organs such as the heart, lung, liver and pancreas.

Speaker - 2
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Biography:

Thilavathy Naidoo has completed his PhD at the age of 47 years from KwaZuluNatal University and currently untertaking postdoctoral studies at KwaZuluNatal Univesity. She is an educator involed in nutrition education at school.She has published 2 papers in reputed journals. She is currently inolved with improving the National School Nutrition Program that is in place in South Africa.

Abstract:

Measure nutritional intake of grade eight learners in a purposively selected public school using 24 hour food recall and the Quantified Food Frequency Questionnaire to identify the food that the participants are consuming and compare the food intake to the South African Food Based Dietary Guideline.This was a South African study conducted in KwaZulu–Natal that addressed the issue of obesity, overweight and nutrient deficiency amongst grade eight girls in a school in Durban Central. The learners at that school came from a diverse cultural and racial background. This was a study in an urban area. The participants that were included was a small percentage from the general population of grade 8 learners in the area. Ninety learners in Grade 8 were assessed before and after an intervention of nutrition education in terms of their body mass index (BMI) and food intake. Two of the instruments used for data collection were the 24 hour food recall questionnaire, and the Quantified Food Frequency Questionnaire (QFFQ), designed by the South African Medical Research Council and compiled by Steyn & Senekal (1991) to gain data on food intake over a period of time. Nutrient intake was determined using the South African Food Data System (SAFOODS) Food Composition Database (2016). ANOVA tests were used to determine significant differences in food intake between the first and second set of measurements. The prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity during session one was respectively 23.3%, 14.5% and 12.2%, with no significant change in session two. The daily kilojoule intake dropped from 17209.24 kJ in session one to 13455.39 kJ in session two for the QFFQ (p = 0.0002). The total amount of carbohydrates decreased from session one compared to session two, from 517.82 to 405.38 (p = 0.0003). Although the intervention was successful in reducing the kilojoule intake of the participants, the kilojoule intake remains higher than the recommended Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) of 8665 kJ for the age group of the participants.

 

Speaker - 3
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Massimo Collino is Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dept. Drug Science and Technology, University of Turin (Italy). He is author of 86 full papers published in international journals with Impact Factor;  Citations: 1886 total citations h-index: 25 He is the European Coordinator of the European Project “Innovative Technological Approaches for validation of Salivary AGEs as novel biomarkers in evaluation of risk factors for diet-related diseases”

Abstract:

Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) are reactive compounds deriving from glycoxidation reactions between the amino groups of proteins and reducing carbohydrates. Recent findings convincingly demonstrate that Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) are modifiable by diet and reflect changes in healthy state. The multidisciplinary project SALIVAGES, granted by the Eupean ERA-HDHL programme, focuses on the identification and validation of non-invasive strategies for monitoring AGEs in the saliva as early and easily accessible biomarkers that are modulated by diet and that potentially indicate a change in health status and/or the risk of developing diet-related diseases. The scientific network involves five different European countries: ITALY (University of Turin), SPAIN (University of Oviedo), IRLAND (National University of Ireland Galway), ROMANIA (University of Cluj-Napoca), GERMANY ((Technische Universität Dresden). Preliminary data based on the integration of preclinical biological and molecular studies, analytical and food chemistry, information technologies, and glycomic analyses will be illustrated and discussed. Overall, the expected results will contribute to create a paradigm shift and reveal new scientific, technological and scholarly horizons in the identification of non-invasive strategies for monitoring biomarkers that are modifiable by diet and reflect either a healthy state, or its transition towards diet-related disease.

 

Speaker : 4
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Biography:

Ružica Tomicic has completed her PhD in biotechnology from Faculty of Technology, University of Novi Sad, Serbia in 2018. Currently she is employed at the Faculty of Technology, University of Novi Sad and work as a Researcher in the Laboratory of Microbiology. During doctoral studies, she had the opportunity to be involved in a research project at the Biotechnical Faculty in Ljubljana, Slovenia where she gained experience in working with pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. As a part of her PhD thesis she studied the influence of environmental factors on microbial adhesion to biotic (such as human colon carcinoma cells HT29-MTX-E12) and abiotic (such as polystyrene, stainless steel, wood) surfaces. Antimicrobial resistance and the search for new alternative solutions such as plant extracts, essential oils and probiotics are of her special scientific interest. She is a member of Serbian Society for Microbiology and a winner of FEMS Research Grant for 2017.

Abstract:

Microbial adhesion and biofilm formation to surfaces is of great environmental, medical and industrial importance and consequently draws considerable attention in the last decades. The persistence of microorganisms in biofilms is a serious hygienic problem in the food industry, causing processing and post-processing cross-contamination leading to reduced product shelf life and effectiveness of sanitizing treatments as well as potentially affecting the consumer’s health. Despite the research efforts devoted on bacterial adhesion, very little information is available on the adhesion behaviors of Candida spp. and Pichia spp. onto stainless steel surfaces, although these yeasts are usually contaminants in the food industry. Hence, in this study we investigated the impact of growth medium and temperature on Candidaand Pichia adherence using stainless steel (AISI 304) discs with different degrees of surface roughness (Ra = 25.20 – 961.9 nm). The adhesion of the yeast strains to stainless steel surfaces grown in Malt Extract broth (MEB) or YPD broth at three temperatures (7°C, 37°C, 43°C for Candida strains and 7°C, 27°C, 32°C for Pichia strains) was assessed by crystal violet staining. The results showed that the nutrient content of medium significantly influenced the quantity of adhered cells by the tested yeasts. Adhesion of C. albicans and C. glabrata on stainless steel surfaces were significantly higher in MEB, whereas for C. parapsilosis and C. krusei it was YPD broth. In the case with P. pijperi and P. membranifaciens, YPD broth was more effective in promoting adhesion than MEB. On the other hand, our data indicated that temperature is a very important factor which considerably affects the adhesion of these yeast. There was also significant difference in cell adhesion on all types of stainless steel surfaces for all tested yeast. An understanding of adhesion behavior of Candida spp. and Pichia spp. under different environmental conditions is key to the development of effective preventive measures against biofilm-associated infection.
Keywords: adhesion, yeast, stainless steel surfaces, growth medium, temperature 

Speaker - 5
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Biography:

Zorica Tomicic has completed her PhD in biotechnology from Faculty of Technology, University of Novi Sad, Serbia in 2018. Currently she is employed at the Institute of Food Technology, University of Novi Sad and works as a Researcher in the Laboratory of Microbiology as well as analysis of amino acids by HPLC.  Studying the virulence traits of pathogenic yeast and bacteria, as well as finding alternative solutions in their control and elimination such as probiotics, plant extracts, essential oils, etc. are of her special scientific interest.

Abstract:

The incidence of infections caused by Candida species (candidosis) has considerably increased over past years. The reason for the increasing prevalence of Candida species is mainly due to the introduction and more widespread use of certain medical practices, such as immunosuppressive therapy, the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and an increase in the number of invasive surgical procedures, such as organ transplantations. Due to increasing resistance of Candida glabrata to existing drugs, it is very important  to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. One promising strategy is the use of the probiotic microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confers a health benefit. They include various bacterial probiotics, while among yeast only Saccharomyces boulardii (nom. nud.) is used extensively as a probiotic and often marketed as a dietary supplement. The beneficial effect of S. boulardii in the case of C. glabrata infections have not been studied yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of S. boulardii cells on the adhesion of C. glabrata. The method used to assess adhesion was crystal violet staining. Our results showed that despite the non-adhesiveness of S. boulardii cells, this probiotic significantly affected the adherence ability of C. glabrata. This effect was highly dependent on C. glabrata strain and was either antagonistic or synergistic.

Speaker - 6

Sourish Bhattacharya

CSIR-Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institut ,India

Title: Stability of Phycobiliproteins using natural preservative ?-Polylysine

Time : 16:40 - 17:10

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Biography:

Sourish Bhattacharya has completed his B. Tech in Biotechnology from West Bengal University of Technology and M.Tech in Fermentation Technology from Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai and PhD from AcSIR-CSMCRI. Presently he is working as a Scientist at CSIR-Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, India.  He is having a strong background in the area of biopolymers for therapeutic applications and nutraceuticals. He has published 17 papers, 3 book chapter and 2 patents to his credit.


 

Abstract:

C-Phycocyanin (PC) and C-Phycoerythrin (PE) are important phycobiliproteins (PBs) with their possible application as colorants in food industries. In the present study, effect of natural preservative, ε-polylysine and chemical preservative, citric acid on the stability of C-PC and C-PE at 4 ± 2°C was studied. Percentage loss of C-PE and C-PC content and effect of pH and fluorescence on C-PC and C-PE was studied. 0.02% ε-polylysine (w/v) was found to be optimum for storage of C-PC and C-PE at 4 ± 2°C and lesser loss of C-PC and C-PE content as compared to citric acid for its storage up to 8 days without any change in colour and pH. The amount of C-PC and C-PE left in the solution containing ε-polylysine was 90.5 and 95.24% respectively. 0.02% ε-polylysine (w/v) was found to be optimum for storage of C-PC and C-PE at 4 ± 2°C and lesser loss of C-PC and C-PE content as compared to citric acid for its storage up to 8 days without any change in colour and pH. The amount of C-PC and C-PE left in the solution containing ε-polylysine was 90.5 and 95.24% respectively. Further, there is a need to replace chemical or synthetic preservatives with natural preservative ?-polylysine as prolonged consumption of these chemical or synthetic preservatives possess health hazard. The present work provides an effective option for replacing these chemical or synthetic preservatives with ε-polylysine as natural preservative.
Keywords: C-phycoerythrin; C-phycocyanin; ε-polylysine; Stability; Natural preservative.

Speaker - 7

Majid Hajifaraji

National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute ,Iran

Title: The effects of probiotic supplementation in prevention of the hyperglycemia induced maternal hypertension

Time : 17:10 - 17:40

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Biography:

Majid Hajifaraji, is a Research Associate Prof. He received his PhD in nutrition from KCL, UK. He has been Director of National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Dean of Faculty from 2010- 2015, Head of WHO- Collaborating Centre for Nutrition Training and Research from 2010- 2015 and President of Iranian Nutrition Society (INS) from 2011- 2015. He is a member of the National Board of Nutrition and academy of Medical Sciences, Iran. He has over 60 publications that have been cited over 740 times and has been serving as Chair and Editor-in- chief, Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences Research and member of the editorial board and reviewer of several reputed Journals. Food Systems for Healthy Diets and Improved Nutrition. 2016, in FAO Headquarters. 

Abstract:

Despite achieved progress in the control and treatment of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), these patients are still at risk of disease complications. The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of probiotic supplement on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among GDM pregnant women.In this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 64 pregnant women with GDM were assigned into two groups and received probiotic capsule (n=32) or placebo (n=32) for 8 weeks. Blood pressures were measured at baseline and 2 weeks intervals and up to 8 weeks.56 subjects were analyzed at the end of the study. After 8 weeks, SBP did not differ significantly in probiotic group at any time checkpoint but increased significantly in placebo group. DBP changes in a trend in probiotic group was obvious after 2 weeks and was reducing towards, however in placebo group, there was a tendency for higher DBP after week 6. There were significant differences between two groups of study after 6 weeks in the terms of SBP[104.828 (2.051) mmHg vs. 112.963 (2.126) mmHg , p=0.008 and 106.552(1.845)mmHg vs. 115.185(1.912)mmHg, p=0.002, in weeks 6 and 8 respectively] and DBP [62.414 (1.353) mmHg vs. 70.741 (1.402) mmHg , p<0.001and 60.690 (1.540)mmHg vs. 71.296 (1.596)mmHg, p< 0.001, in weeks 6 and 8 respectively]. In addition the mean differences of serum hs-CRP, TNF-α and MDA between the probiotic [-0.704 (0.622); -0.0412 (0.103) and - 0.942 (0.429)] vs. the placebo [0.823 (0.945); 0.379 (0.123) and 0.848 (0.339)] were significantly decreased respectively.
Conclusion: The results demonstrated that taking probiotic supplements for 8 weeks in patients with GDM prevented the increase of SBP and resulted in reduction of DBP after 2 weeks of consumption.
Keywords: Probiotic; Supplement; Gestational Diabetes Mellitus; Blood Pressure

Speaker - 8

Abba PacômeObouayeba

Jean Lorougnon Guédé Université ,Ivory Coast

Title: Pharmacological properties of the principal polyphenols of the petals of hibiscus sabdariffa

Time : 17:40 - 18:10

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Biography:

Abba P. Obouayeba is Assistant Professor of Biochemistry-Pharmacology at the Agrovalorisation Laboratory of the Department of Biochemistry-Microbiology at the Jean Lorougnon Guédé University in Daloa (Côte d'Ivoire). He is the author of about ten scientific papers published in international peer-reviewed journals, most of which are impact-factor; Citations: 99 and index h: 5. He is a member of the

Abstract:

Background: Hibiscus sabdariffa (Malvaceae) is food and medicinal plant rich in phytochemicals, responsible for its pharmacological properties. The petals of Hibiscus sabdariffa, being extensively used to make the «Bissap», a non-alcoholic beverage commonly consumed in West Africa, the objective of this study was to determine its principal phenolic compounds and to evaluate some of their pharmacological properties from the extract of these petals.
Methodology: The phytochemical study was carried out by HPLC and that of the cardioprotective and hepatoprotective activities were done with Wistar rats distributed in groups. Treatments were administered orally in a single dose for seven days, followed by the injection of a hepatotoxic (DNPH) or cardiotoxic (doxorubicin) substance. Blood samples were taken for biochemical analysis of cardiac and hepatic markers.
Results: Results identified anthocyanins (delphinidine 3-O-sambubioside and cyanidine 3-O-sambubioside) and flavonoids (gossypetin, hibiscetin, quercetin and sabdaretin) as being the principal compounds of the petal extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa. In addition, the results highlighted the cardioprotective and hepatoprotective properties of Hibiscus sabdariffa.
Conclusion: Thus, the consumption of the non-alcoholic drink commonly known as “Bissap” could have beneficial effects for the protection of the heart and liver